5 Career Options for Machine Learning

Students studying machine learning will have a wide array of opportunities before them, as our society edges ever closer to automating significant numbers of processes performed by human beings today. Many of the operations behind-the-scenes operations of apps we use every day are programmed using machine learning. Careers in machine learning are increasing in demand, as algorithms are needed in more industries. Below are some of the opportunities available to a student taking machine learning courses in pursuit of a machine learning degree.

1. Software Engineer

The job of a software engineer will require a strong aptitude for writing code, as the candidate will be tasked with creating code that supports the development of algorithms. As such, the software engineer will need to write a program that details how the computer is to perform specific functions, and this must be written using step-by-step instructions. Computer software engineers will need to use the principles from computer science and engineering in mathematics acquired from their machine learning degree to design and develop software.

Machine learning courses can equip students to write software programs for different purposes, including operating systems, network distribution, and for converting programs into executabe files. These various systems must also undergo rigorous testing, and if bugs are found, a software engineer must examine the code to find and fix the problem.

Careers in machine learning, such as software engineering, require that a candidate be able to listen to their client and understand his or her needs on a deep level. They are then to take that information and build a system according to the customer’s parameters, and they will generally also be responsible for its maintenance. It is helpful to be proficient in Java, C++, C, as Fortran and COBOL are becoming used less frequently. The salary for a software engineer starts at $69,000, and the average yearly pay is $104,000. Software engineers, at the top end, can make as much as $153,000.

2. Software Developer

At its most basic, a software developer is responsible for creating the flow charts that enable the coders to do their job, and they are typically regarded as the creative minds behind computer programs. They can also sometimes develop the underlying infrastructure that enables computer networks to function, and they can be responsible for designing specific computer functions.

Software developers also help to make sure that upgrades work properly, and they will provide documentation for the systems they build to assist with the machine’s ongoing maintenance. Their work involves strategic planning, including the creation of models and diagrams, to plot out how an entire system will need to work in concert with its various parts and components.

The work of a software developer includes testing machinery, and this requires that the computer continue to function correctly while this taking place. You will need to possess a strong grasp of computer science, data structures, and the various components of computer architecture, such as distributed processing, memory, and how caches work.

Because algorithms figure in so prominently in the role of a software engineer, you will need to study statistics and probability. In addition, you will be responsible for estimating the network structure’s underlying datasets for the purpose of finding patterns, and you will need to predict the properties of unseen instances, such as anomalies. The starting salary for a software developer is $58,000, with a median pay of $81,829, and a high-end wage of $120,000.

3. Designer in Human-Centered Machine Learning

The designer who works creating human-centered machine learning is occupied with developing systems that can process information and recognize patterns. This alleviates the need to manually design programs that can account for every conceivable scenario, and this allows the machine to ‘learn’. When this learning is centered around human beings, it creates an individual and ‘smart’ user experience. This is used today for video rental services like Netflix that present viewers with movie choices representative of what they might like to watch.

Machine learning courses will provide the foundation to understanding how a computer can learn, preparing the students for careers in machine learning. Your machine learning degree will provide cutting-edge instruction in a field that is only increasing in importance. Human-centered machine learning is responsible for the algorithms behind Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram feeds, and it is also used for YouTube video recommendations. Amazon uses it to decide what products to show you next, and various other online retailers are following suit.

Designers of human-centered machine learning are also involved in creating software for banks, as an increasing number of banking transactions are conducted online and electronically. Complex computer systems are designed to comb through vast numbers of financial transfers to determine which ones may be potentially fraudulent. These distinctions are important to make, because unnecessarily placing fraud blocks on accounts that have not been compromised can caused inconvenience and customer impact, causing their purchases to be declined. This position pays $69,000 at the low end, an average of $97,000 per year, and can top out at $125,000.

4. Data Scientist

Programming skills are a must when applying to be a data scientist, and having a strong knowledge base in statistics will be vitally important. Programming languages that incorporate statistics, such as R, Python, and SQL play a vital role in helping candidates do their jobs. A data scientist will also be involved in information analysis, and this is the technique of using data to discover useful information through the process of inspection, cleaning, and modeling. This helps inform decision making and requires the data scientist to suggest reasonable conclusions.

Data scientists are also required to source voluminous sets of data located in disparate places to find actionable insights, information on which action can be taken. This job also entails looking for problems and working to correct these issues. The position of data scientist incorporates machine learning, and he or she will be occupied with finding meaning in the data. A data scientist will attempt to understand the deeper implications and human impact of her project and will work with others, collaborating with those in divergent disciplines to arrive at the answers that she needs. The low-end annual wage for a data scientist is $87,000, the average pay is $121,000, and the high end of the salary range is $158,000.

5. Computational Linguist

The technologies of machine learning often work in tandem with voice-recognition software to help people navigate through telephone systems for banks, utility companies, and doctors’ offices. Computer linguists help computers learn how to understand spoken language and to continually improve the systems that currently exist, as they frequently make mistakes. Talk to text applications are becoming more popular and are also a tool for people who are blind.

Computational linguists also help computers learn patterns of speech, and they can help computers acquire the capability for translating words into other spoken languages. The goal, in many cases, is to help the machines actually comprehend language. Computational linguists must be familiar with the ways in which human beings use language in order to reproduce these capabilities in computers.

This job requires a strong understanding of the syntax, spelling, and grammar of at least one language, in addition to machine learning, in order to create rules to help a computer acquire these same skills. A computational linguist’s starting salary is approximately $65,000 per year, averages $91,000, and can pay as much as $120,000.